May 18 F*** May 2013 Scans + Photoshoots

I bring you scans from the May 2013 issue of F*** magazine, plus the Photoshoot pictures and a new outtake from InStyle photoshoot. Also scans from German Interview magazine and Total Film July, thanks to Luciana from AmyAdamsFan.com.

Gallery Links:

June 05 ‘Man of Steel’ star Henry Cavill needs nerves of steel

A great article and a new photo!

The British actor has seen starring roles, but never anything like iconic comic-book hero Superman.

Henry Cavill wears blue jeans, flip-flops and a T-shirt while walking through a flock of diners at Fishbar restaurant, but it might as well be a form-fitting bodysuit and a red cape.

Maybe it’s his stride, physique, deep blue eyes and coiffed dark hair, the guy really does look like Superman, even while relaxing at a beach eatery.

“When my hair was longer months ago, you wouldn’t have said as much,” says Cavill, 30. “But at the moment, yeah, I guess there’s a certain resemblance.”

This “certain resemblance” was strong enough that director Zack Snyder nabbed the British actor to play the iconic comic-book character in Man of Steel, the much-awaited Superman reboot that hits screens June 14. It was also enough that Cavill was pursued for 2006’s Superman Returns, though he lost out to Brandon Routh when the project switched directors.

The experience of having come so close just makes snaring the Man of Steel role that much more poignant. It also gave Cavill some valuable training for the path-seeking character he portrays.

“I guess you can say Henry was born to play Superman,” says Snyder, noting the actor’s physical similarities. “But all these life experiences have come together. He’s gone through a journey. In our movie, Clark Kent gets jostled around by life and then becomes Superman. Henry has done the same thing.”

Cavill already has had an impressive career, including roles in 2002’s The Count of Monte Cristo, Showtime’s The Tudors and 2011’s Immortals (which had a No. 1 opening weekend with $32 million).

But he also has shrugged off high-profile setbacks such as losing out to Daniel Craig for the role of James Bond.

“Having had all the ups and downs maybe made me want to work all the harder,” Cavill says. “Yeah, bad things will happen to you. And you’ll get kicked (down) a few times. Stand up.”

But with Man of Steel, “I got lucky enough to have a second shot with different people whose vision I fit into,” he says.

Source

June 09 How Henry Cavill overcame obesity and bullying to become the first ever British Superman

When Henry Cavill was 17, Russell Crowe visited his school to film scenes for the 2000 film Proof Of Life.
‘One of the guys at school was playing Russell’s son,’ says Cavill.

‘The scene involved Russell coming to visit him. I was one of the Combined Cadet Force (CCF) kids chosen to be in the background.
‘Between takes everyone was standing around and I thought, “We all look like clunkers standing here staring at him.” So I went over and said, “Hello. My name is Henry and I’m thinking of becoming an actor.”
‘He was very encouraging. He told me, “Sometimes they treat you well and sometimes they don’t and sometimes the pay is great and sometimes it’s not. But it’s great fun.”
‘And then everyone else who had seen me chatting came over and started asking for his autograph. I waved at him and said, “Quick, run!” I remember he laughed.

‘A couple of days later I got a note from Russell that said, “Dear Henry, the journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step. Best, Russell.”

‘He also sent me a signed photo from Gladiator, an Aussie rugby jersey, some Aussie sweets and a jar of Vegemite. It was incredibly kind of him. It actually made me think, “Yes, this is what I want to do.”’
Thrilling though a chance encounter with a bona fide star must have been for a teenage boy, Cavill never dreamed his tale would have a Hollywood ending, but it has.
This week, the callow schoolboy becomes the first British actor to play Superman, in Man of Steel… and his mentor, Crowe, plays his father.

‘It’s amazing,’ he laughs. ‘It felt like he was there to greet me at the end of this long journey.’
Today, Cavill is standing on the set of Hollywood blockbuster Man Of Steel in Vancouver, telling me about the day he first donned the Superman cape.

‘I was infused with this childlike excitement. I had been to numerous fittings, through all the prototype phases, with hundreds of bits of the costume. I promised myself I wouldn’t look in the mirror until the whole shebang was ready.

When I turned around, it took my breath away. The “S” emblazoned on my chest, the boots, the red cape… Superman seeps into every boy’s consciousness.

‘I remember running around the garden with a makeshift cape, then later a hand-me-down from one of my older brothers.
‘The “S” is the third most recognisable symbol on the planet, after the Christian Cross and Coca-Cola. It isn’t a Hallowe’en costume. I was Superman.’

There was a certain poetic justice in that moment, which was not lost on ‘Fat Cavill’ – his phrase.
Staring back from the mirror was the once-obese teenager who had been bullied at that same boarding school where he met Crowe; the struggling British actor who had lost out on both an earlier role of Superman, then James Bond – to Daniel Craig.
‘I don’t know if I believe in fate,’ Cavill, 30, had said when we first met. But vindication is surely his.

As a teenager Cavill was overweight and unhappy. Aged 13, he arrived midway through the first term at Stowe, one of Britain’s most prestigious public schools, where fees are more than £9,000 a term.

‘I got there late and the other kids had all formed their groups and cliques,’ he recalls as we sit to the side of a gigantic green screen during a break in filming a scene where Superman flies.

Six foot tall and nearly 16st, with an impressively chiselled jawline, Cavill looks every inch the superhero.
‘I had been head boy at my prep school. I had ambition. I wanted to be head boy at my boarding school. I think, immediately, that put some noses out of joint.
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March 20 Henry Cavill talks Fashion and Film for Shortlist Mode

Henry Cavill is featured on the new issue of Shortlist Mode and it has a brand new fashionable photoshoot, which I uploaded in the gallery, the article is below:



MODE cover star Henry Cavill talks to Andrew Dickens about the joy of polo necks, the fun of guns and the wardrobe issues of being Superman

For a man who’s used to getting changed in a phone box, swapping clothes in the offices of a private air charter company must seem positively luxurious. Mind you, Henry Cavill needs the space.

Only weeks after he wrapped up filming the latest Superman film, with shoulders you could drive across and biceps like prize hams, he’s still sporting a superhero physique that can make us mortals feel simultaneously fat and skinny.

He’s also just wrapped MODE’s jet-setting cover shoot. His look, as he swaggers around an airfield just outside Exeter (giving rise to “Is it bird? Is it a plane? Yes, it’s a plane” gags), has a dash of Sixties styling, which is a nod to the next Cavill film to hit cinemas: Guy Ritchie’s take on the classic TV show The Man From UNCLE. Cavill, it transpires, loves clothes, loves dressing up, but thanks to those muscles, his passion has problems.

“It’s bloody expensive,” he says, now dressed down in a checked shirt and jeans, and digesting a sausage butty. “I’m buying new clothes every year. I’m bigger than I was in the first Superman film (Man Of Steel), so I don’t fit the same clothes I did then. And when I was doing The Man From UNCLE, I was smaller, so it’s a constant shift in body size and shape. It’s fun, but you’ve got to have a big closet, so you can leave stuff in there and go, ‘Oh, back to that size again – I can wear that sweater’.

“But I never throw stuff away because I’ve changed size. Things I’ve loved, I’ve worn so much I’ve had to get rid. I’ll love something so much, I still see it the way it initially was, and then a friend will say, ‘Why do you dress like a homeless person? Look at your f*cking clothes, mate.’ And then you realise that the T-shirt you adore has four holes in it. And that pair of jeans no longer has a fashionable rip, it’s just your knee hanging out.”

Cavill’s character in The Man From UNCLE is Napoleon Solo. Or, ‘the one played by Robert Vaughn’ for those of us who spent childhood Saturday teatimes being entertained by TV repeats – always featuring men in roll necks – from this strange, colourful decade our parents banged on about. Solo, a postwar art thief-turned-Cold War agent, is the dapper playboy – who Cavill describes as “an arsehole with a heart” – working alongside Soviet spying machine Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer in the film, David McCallum when it was on TV). It’s Solo’s look that inspired the shoot. Cavill likes this.

“I really do,” he says. “I was looking at some photos of myself in The Man From UNCLE, and I thought, ‘Those are really great.’ I love wearing classic suits. And the great thing about the Sixties is that they had a little bit of flair. You can go big flair, or just a little bit, and I like a little bit. I’m more of a classic guy; I’m not outspoken, so it’s nice to wear something that looks so sharp and has a bit of colour.”

And your feelings on polo necks?

“Polo necks are great! There’s this attitude towards polo necks, where if you wear one, then all of a sudden you’re a dickhead. And it’s not fair, because polo necks look really good. It’s just a matter of people opening their minds to it. We can wear all sorts of stuff these days, so why not a polo neck?”

Why not, indeed? And it wasn’t just the polo necks Cavill enjoyed about the film; he claims Ritchie is “the best person I’ve ever worked with. He makes great movies, but doesn’t sacrifice any fun or enjoyment in the making – if I could do every movie in the future with him, I would happily do it.” This, of course, won’t be the case. For example, Ritchie isn’t directing Stratton – the film for which Cavill’s currently preparing. Based on the John Stratton novels by ex-SBS commando Duncan Falconer, it’s something of a passion project for Cavill, whose brother Nik is in the Royal Marines, and he’s co-producing the film with another brother, Charlie.

“I’ve always been a huge supporter of the Royal Marines, and therefore the SBS is largely – not entirely – drawn from the Marines,” he says. “It’s my chance to be the Marine I never got to be, and draw some attention to them, hopefully raise some money. I’m an ambassador for the Royal Marines trust fund. And I like the guns and stuff. I do. It’s fun.”

Nor did Ritchie get his hands on the biggest film of Cavill’s career to date, the currently titled Batman vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice. Next summer’s clashing of the capes – and cause of Cavill’s enormous wardrobe requirements – sees his Man Of Steel take on Ben Affleck’s Dark Knight. A major salvo from DC in the war with Marvel for comicfilmiverse supremacy, it’s a subject of anticipation and hope. What can he tell us about it?

“I can’t tell you anything.”

Not even from a fashion perspective? Surely there was some costume envy. With all that black, Batman has a much more chic look. And external underpants have never caught on.

“I’m incredibly loyal to my character,” says Cavill, with genuine conviction. “I love him. I’m protective of him. Superman’s the dude. He’s an absolute ledge. I’d never say, ‘I’d prefer to be that superhero.’ I’m Superman.”

The Man From UNCLE is at cinemas nationwide from 14 August

Source

July 15 The Hollywood Reporter: Suicide Squad & Batman V Superman Cast Photo

The Hollywood Reporter has released an exclusive photo with the actors and directors of WB/DC Comics:


Good and evil collided at The Hollywood Reporter’s exclusive Comic-Con photo shoot with the directors and stars of Warner Bros.’ upcoming DC Comics adaptations.

Superheroes and supervillains collided — quite amicably, we must say — at The Hollywood Reporter’s top-secret Comic-Con photo shoot.

After stunning the Hall H crowd on Saturday with new footage, 17 actors, as well as directors Zack Snyder and David Ayer, from Warner Bros.’ Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad — together comprising the long-awaited first phase of Warners’ DC Cinematic Universe — zoomed off for what would be their first photo together.

While both casts appeared during Warner Bros.’ panel, they didn’t take the stage at the same time. So THR’s photo shoot was not only the first time that the two casts got together, but for many it was their first time meeting one another entirely.

Jai Courtney mightily shook hands with Jesse Eisenberg while Henry Cavill chatted with Will Smith, who introduced him to Jay Hernandez. Cara Delevingne and Gal Gadot posed for a selfie together.

Ayer and his Suicide Squad cast — Smith, Margot Robbie, Courtney, Delevingne, Joel Kinnaman, Viola Davis, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Hernandez, Adam Beach and Karen Fukuhara — arrived backstage first. They rushed to the craft services table, scarfing down sandwiches and snacks.

The group was on a whirlwind trip, to say the least. Ayer had been working on the film in Toronto until 1 a.m. Friday night, then woke up the next morning to fly with his cast to San Diego. They were in San Diego for a little under three hours before having to rush back out to the airport at 1 p.m. to head back to Toronto. Ayer, who was trying to convince his handlers to stop to get burritos before he headed back to Canada, needed to return to shooting second unit the next day.

Onstage, Ayer touted his villain-focused movie: “Who’s got the best bad guys out there? DC Comics,” he said. “I’m not trying to start no East Coast-West Coast feud with Marvel Comics, but someone has got to say the truth.”

The footage he showed was surprisingly dark in tone, but at the shoot Ayer told THR of the film, “The real shock is how hilarious it’s going to be.”

Smith, who was the only castmember to speak (if only a few sentences) onstage during the Suicide Squad presentation, relished leaving the crowd wanting more.

“This was just a little taste,” he told THR backstage. “We’ll see them again next year.”

If the movies are part of a big DC family, Batman v. Superman is the older, more mature sibling on which the weight of responsibility falls. Suicide Squad is the bratty little kid, chewing bubble gum and tagging walls.

Each cast has bonded in different ways. Loud and boisterous, the Suicide Squad cast was bonded by an attitude fueled by brashness and exuberance.

“We’re very much a squad,” said Robbie, with her co-star Delevingne joking, “We should start a dance squad.” Indeed, the cast was seen taking plenty of selfies together, laughing at inside jokes and throwing up their hands in faux-squad poses during the shoot.

The cast of Batman v. Superman looked on with bemusement, like they weren’t quite sure what to do with the family member that steals cars for a living. They were bonded too, it just showed in a more subdued way — like when Adams jokingly sat on Affleck’s lap when they were taking their seats for the shoot. But don’t let their quiet demeanor fool you: Adams photo-bombed Delevingne and Gadot with aplomb.

And while they may be only newly acquainted, there’s already a friendly rivalry brewing between the two casts, with the Suicide Squad group joking that they’d eat all the sandwiches before the Dawn of Justice cast got there. Affleck, meanwhile, joked that he wouldn’t be waiting on the slacking Suicide Squad to take his group photo.

Source

August 06 Men’s Fitness September 2015 Preview

Henry Cavill is featured on the September issue of Men’s Fitness, and here is a preview of the article and two pictures from the photoshoot. On their website, you can watch a Behind Scenes video. Below are screen captures from the video and pictures from the shoot:


Gallery Links:

The Article:

HENRY CAVILL: SUPER SPY
He’s a proper English gentleman who became Hollywood’s all-American badass. But strip away the tights, Savile Row suits, and secret identities, and who is Henry Cavill?

I’m having an afternoon beer with Superman.

More specifically, I’m having a proper British pint, a golden, glistening glass whose shimmering depths promise all the glory of that most fleeting of moments: the English summertime. It’s a rare sunny day in west London. We’re sitting in the sweltering beer garden of a pub in leafy Twickenham—near where England’s national team plays rugby union, the bone-crunching football-with-no-helmets battle royale often described as “a hooligan’s game played by gentlemen”—and 32-year-old Henry Cavill is drinking his second pint of pilsner top (a pilsner with a dash of lemonade) and radiating contentment.

Cavill is wearing a shapeless dark green Royal Marines hoodie (his brother Nik is a lieutenant colonel who served three tours in Afghanistan and in the invasion of Iraq) and sporting a wildly tangled beard that would guarantee his anonymity had he not spent much of 2013’s blockbuster Man of Steel sporting, well, a wildly tangled beard. But no one bothers him. We are far from Hollywood, in every sense. “If I suggested to an American journalist that we do an interview over a beer,” says Cavill, “they’d find it very weird.” (Full disclosure: I am also British.)

Beer, wooden tables, small dogs. The scene couldn’t be more English if Her Majesty the Queen showed up with tea and crumpets. It’s fitting, because Henry Cavill is a very English Englishman. Born in Jersey, the idyllic island in the English Channel (not the industrial zone adjacent to New York City) and educated at Stowe, the private boarding school, Cavill embodies what his fellow countrymen would identify as “officer class.” Men with Cavill’s privileged upbringing and schooling are often accused of being snobs. But they’re also described as steadfast, honorable, and unfailingly polite. Cavill is the latter. He is a gentleman. He is old-school.

So it came as something of a surprise, back in the U.K. in 2011, when Cavill was cast as the all-American Last Son of Krypton in Man of Steel, director Zack Snyder and producer Christopher Nolan’s dark, controversial take on the Superman origin story, in which Cavill’s carefully controlled moral turmoil suggests that Superman’s true superpower is a stiff upper lip. His compelling performance established Cavill as an A-lister, cementing his spot in next year’s sure-to-be-blockbuster Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, in which he squares off against Ben Affleck’s Dark Knight, and two subsequent ensemble Justice League films, DC Comics’ answer to archrival Marvel’s The Avengers movies.

Before all that, however, Cavill appears onscreen as a character who couldn’t be more different from his clean-cut Kal-El. This month he plays the cynical, debonair thief-turned-super-spy Napoleon Solo in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., director Guy Ritchie’s frenetic reboot of the Cold War TV series. Joyfully unpretentious, the movie is a fast-paced marvel of period production design, like Mad Men, but with fights and car chases instead of pitch meetings and cigarettes. Playing opposite Armie Hammer (the Winklevii in The Social Network and the masked star of The Lone Ranger) as ascetic Soviet hardman Illya Kuryakin, Cavill’s Napoleon is a scoundrel with style. Forget truth, justice, and the American way—Solo is out for himself.

Having claimed the mantle of cinema’s ultimate good guy, is Cavill now also angling to take ownership of the most charismatic jerk in cinema?

March 25 Photoshoots Update: Batman v Superman Promos & Portraits

The promotional pictures for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice just keep showing up, here are some good ones. Don’t forget to credit if you repost these.



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November 21 Henry Cavill for Los Angeles Times: Superman’s Return in ‘Justice League’

Henry spoke with Los Angeles Times during the Justice League press junket in London early this month. He discussed Superman’s return in the film, and confirms he’s still contracted for at least one more film to appear as the Man of Steel.

By now it’s likely not a spoiler to reveal that “Justice League” includes the return of Superman, who sacrificed himself to save humanity at the end of 2016’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.” That film, which was generally regarded as overly dark and somewhat unwieldy, gave audiences a version of Superman (Henry Cavill) that felt morose and off-base from the comic books. Here, filmmaker Zack Snyder — as well as Joss Whedon, who stepped in to direct the re-shoots — uses “Justice League” as a chance to reestablish the character.

“He’s definitely different from previous incarnations,” Cavill says, speaking a few weeks ago during the “Justice League” press junket here. “I feel like this is the natural progression from the end of ‘Man of Steel’ into what he is now. This is a rebirth of the character, to coin the D.C. comics franchise right now: It’s a refresh.” He adds, “This movie highlights the qualities of Superman that exist in the comic books. That’s something I’ve always been very keen to highlight in the character. This rebirth provided the opportunity for me to play those characteristics.”

Superman was largely left out of the marketing campaign for “Justice League,” and most of the cast and the filmmakers did their best to keep the revival a secret for as long as possible. But fans, especially those familiar with the comic books, had been speculating for months, asking: “How can you have ‘Justice League’ without Superman?” One of the only clues for his return? Reports that Cavill’s mustache for the upcoming “Mission Impossible” sequel had to be digitally removed during the re-shoots, meaning that Superman would be somewhere in “Justice League” (“That damn mustache,” Cavill jokes). As it turned out, the studio always intended to include Superman but did its best to keep the rollout spoiler free.

“I think die-hard fans will know you can’t have the Justice League without Superman,” says producer Deborah Snyder. “Without Superman, there was this loss of hope. At the end of [‘Batman v Superman’], there was this impending doom. This danger that was coming. That was the impetus of Bruce [Wayne] recruiting the Justice League. That was the why. But the threat is so big and large that they still needed Superman. They needed to be a team.”

“His self-sacrifice causes such a huge ripple,” adds producer Charles Roven. “It’s so inspiring that his presence is really all over this movie before you know whether or not he’s going to come back. The world is not the same without him, because he was representative of hope. Here’s the thing: We wanted to make a movie that was about hope and the positive force hope is. And it meant that you had to bring him back.”

The process by which Batman (Ben Affleck) and the other members of the Justice League bring Superman back to life is complicated, involving several scenes that would be impossible to fully explain here. Suffice to say that Superman’s lifeless corpse (which was not played by Cavill for these scenes) is not lifeless for long. And ultimately, it’s Superman’s reaction to being awoken from death that’s more interesting than how he’s actually brought back. His initial anger and confusion shift to an emotional confrontation with himself over what’s happened to Lois Lane (Amy Adams) and his mother, Martha (Diane Lane), since his death.

“I think it’s very confusing for him in that scenario, as it would be for any of us,” Cavill says. “He’s trying to work out what the hell happened. I’m sure there’s a sense of failure there, akin to that sense of ‘I wish I hadn’t died so I could still be here and the world wouldn’t be in the state it’s in now and I could have protected my mother and Lois from the pain they’ve been experiencing.’ There’s that sense of guilt, but it comes with unconditional love. It’s not rational. One of the great things about us is that we still care even though we may not have a reason to feel guilty.”

Read the full story.

May 17 Henry Cavill for ‘How to Spend It’

Henry shows off this summer’s coolest casual looks in a new photo session, photographed by Damian Foxe, for HowtoSpendIt.com. How the fashion style makes Henry’s chiseled good looks stand out even more is out of this world. The website also offers details on the outfits and where you can find/purchase them.

May 28 Henry Cavill for Hugo Boss

Henry Cavill is the new face and ambassador of Hugo Boss’ BOSS Eyewear. Their latest summer collection is launched as the #SharpenYourFocus campaign, and Henry is the perfect embodiment of this campaign. Check out some outtakes in our gallery! Also, check out a short interview below wherein Henry discusses how he approaches obstacles, and some behind-the-scenes clips from the photo session under the cut!

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June 09 New Layouts + Gallery Update

Mr. Cavill has a new look! This one features the photoshoots taken last year with a little touch of Superman-inspired style. I hope you all love it as much as I do. I was planning on having a new one along with a gallery update for Henry’s birthday last month, but I couldn’t make it in time.

Speaking of which, I have updated the gallery with tons of stuff, new and some old ones updated with higher-quality versions, from public appearances to photo sessions to magazine scans! A lot of these stuff are from Annie that she had but didn’t have the time to sort or upload. I have also added high-resolution screen captures, back from The Man from U.N.C.L.E. to Justice League, including the Blu-ray special features from the latter. Make sure you give our gallery a visit!



July 10 Henry Cavill for Square Mile

Henry has blessed us with another gorgeous photo shoot as he graces the cover of this month’s issue of Square Mile magazine! He discussed a lot in this interview, including the much-awaited Mission: Impossible – Fallout, being Superman, some of his earlier projects, and much more. Check out the two covers and some outtakes in our gallery.

Cavill is bigger: north of 6ft, and with a build to make a wardrobe search for the nearest brick shithouse to cower behind. Your grandmother would describe him as a “strapping young fellow”, while your wife quietly slips her wedding ring into the nearest drawer. Never has a man looked quite so obviously Leading.

A cinematic star needs a cinematic setting – so we recruited the Shangri La penthouse at the Shard, and thus half of London sprawled out beyond gigantic panes of glass. We have gathered on the X floor of Europe’s tallest building to discuss Cavill’s role in Mission: Impossible – Fallout; or rather the little that Cavill can discuss about his role in Mission: Impossible – Fallout.

Refreshingly for a modern blockbuster – where spoilers are tossed into the first trailer, and the plot can be deciphered a month before general release – very little is known about the sixth installment of the M:I franchise. Naturally, it stars Tom Cruise as daredevil superspy Ethan Hunt, naturally there is a countdown to an imminent global catastrophe, and naturally a lot of vehicles will blow up.

Cavill is the headline addition to an ensemble cast that includes returning M:I alumni Simon Pegg, Rebecca Ferguson, Michelle Monaghan, and Ving Rhames – a veteran of the very first installment way back in 1996. (Cavill was 13.) Our man plays “primary antagonist” August Walker – a thrusting CIA agent whose methods clash with Hunt’s inexhaustible heroism. (Hunt can’t be much chill, although neither is Walker by the sound of things.)

“I’m forced upon Ethan’s team by the director of the CIA. August Walker is a sledgehammer to Ethan’s scalpel. He will get the job done no matter what. His MO is so different to Ethan’s that naturally they don’t get along at all. Walker has no problem with collateral damage,” notes Cavill with a certain fondness. “He’s fine with it.”

Which is fortunate, as the trailer promises plenty of collateral will be duly damaged. Including the leading man: Tom Cruise broke his ankle chasing Cavill across the rooftops of London. (Fortunately for on-set harmony, the men were filming at the time.) Cruise, the utter pro, finished the take, but production was halted for several weeks.

Cavill spent the hiatus developing the character of Walker – and enjoying a little downtime. Every cloud… “I didn’t break my ankle, so I got a holiday and my character got better!” he says cheerily. “Wasn’t even a cloud: just silver lining!”

After such a mishap, it might seem prudent to tackle the dialogue scenes and retire to the trailer for the heavy stuff. Cavill is made of sterner stuff, and insisted on performing the vast majority of his own stunts. (He can’t share much details about the lone outlier, except to warn: “If you have two actors involved in that stunt, it increases the risk tenfold. And when we’re talking about that kind of stunt, if the risk goes up just a little bit, people die.”)

Read the full interview over at Square Mile.

July 10 Henry Cavill for GQ Australia

We must be in heaven because we got two new photo shoots in one day! This time, it’s for GQ Australia, and the outtakes are very pretty. It reminds me of the Men’s Health shoot back in 2008. In the interview, Henry discussed his best life lessons, the #MeToo movement, the upcoming Mission: Impossible – Fallout, and more. Check out the outtakes in our gallery and a snippet of the interview below.

As I set my phone on record, it starts to feel as if I’m about to get Dorff’d. “It’s better to step away,” says Cavill when asked whether he reads his own interviews. “A lot of stuff, in the written word, sounds very different from the intention.”

Cavill is still a little reluctant to open up. When asked what a visit home to Jersey gives him, he says it acts as a chance to reflect on how he’s changed each year.

So, how has he changed this year?

“The usual things, that people change every year.”

Anything more specific?

“You start to reflect on the past and consider the future while enjoying the present.” (6. ‘Keep secrets’.)

Again, we are empathetic. Cavill is coming off a long run of work: Mission: Impossible – Fallout (the sixth instalment of the Tom Cruise-led action-film franchise in which he plays a moustachioed foil to Cruise’s eternal Ethan Hunt) – was a marathon shoot, and it’s about to enter a marathon publicity tour.

Cavill spent a year working with Tom Cruise, and says precisely what so many say about Cruise. “Tom has got this incredible energy. He’s very charming and very engaging. He will remember details of your first meeting which you don’t remember. You’re person number 600 that he met that day, but he’ll remember your dog’s name and that your brother was unwell that day.”

Suffice to say, when you’re managing a Mission: Impossible workload, and blockbuster-sized demand, you need to draw lines.

So, Henry Cavill has boundaries. He won’t pose for photos at airports because, in the event of a mob forming, he’d rather not hide in a toilet. He won’t pose for photos at the gym, either – in-between sets is ‘me’ time, and that’s fair. He won’t text at the dinner table – not unless he’s asked permission in advance. (21. ‘Don’t allow the phone to interrupt important moments. It’s there for our convenience, not the caller’s.’)

He has an extraordinarily tight circle of friends, and they’re tightly curated. He’s heard the, ‘You’ve changed’ thing before, and if you’re saying that, you already don’t get it, and you may not have really ever been friends.

His real friends? They get it. “They go, ‘Wow! He is worked to the bone. Poor guy. I wonder how we can support him.’ Rather than, ‘What’s wrong with you?’”

Read the full interview over at GQ Australia.

August 02 Henry for Prestige Hong Kong

We are on a roll! Henry is featured in this month’s issue of Prestige magazine, and it is such another gorgeous shoot. Check out the cover and some outtakes in our gallery!

Henry Cavill is a gentleman. It’s in his actions, his diction, his dress sense and the fact that he’s unfailingly polite. When he arrives at our top-secret photo shoot location, he’s wearing a Royal Marines Charity hoodie, blue jeans and smart brown shoes – and, until now, I’ve never seen anyone look so dapper in jeans and a sweatshirt. Cavill also holds the door open for me on two occasions. It’s the small gestures that add up. This 35-year-old British actor has accomplished a lot, but still remains humble in what’s known to be a fickle industry.

“What is it like being considered a sex symbol?” He’s a bit surprised by the question and responds by saying, “Oh, God. Am I? I don’t know if I’m considered a sex symbol. ‘I don’t know’ is the answer to that question. I think, I mean, cool? If that’s the case, yay? My brothers will have a good laugh about that.” 

Cavill has starred in a string of box office hits including his performance as Napoleon Solo in the action spy comedy The Man from U.N.C.L.E., not to mention him suiting up for the role of Clark Kent/Superman in three DC films. This summer, we’ll also catch him on the big screen in Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Off-screen, Cavill’s schedule is hectic. Besides co-founding the film, TV and events company Promethean Productions with his brothers Charlie and Ben Blankenship, Cavill is actively involved in charity work as an ambassador for the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and The Royal Marines Charity, a British organisation that provides support to serving marines, veterans and their families.

Cavill was born in Jersey in the Channel Islands, where the beach was just a 15-minute walk from the family home. The second-youngest of five boys, his career began when he bagged the role of Albert Mondego in the 2002 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo. Back then, he was just a lad at England’s Stowe School and it was uncertain whether he’d pursue a full-time acting career. But by the time the movie had wrapped, Cavill had two agents, one in the UK and one in the US. 

Starring as the most famous comic-book character in not one but three blockbuster films, Cavill was the lead in Man of SteelBatman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Justice League (the first two are the highest-grossing Superman films of all time). As it turns out, “Supes,” as he affectionately calls him, was also the young Cavill’s favourite superhero.

You can read more of the story over at Prestige Online.