Henry Cavill for The Hollywood Reporter

written by Jasper XI.XI

The year is coming to a close and we still got blessed with a gorgeous new photoshoot! Henry spoke with The Hollywood Reporter and talked about a lot of things, including the new season of The Witcher, Highlander, his future on Superman and Mission Impossible, and taking on the mantle of James Bond.

Henry Cavill stands in a Miami hotel room looking like a comic book drawing made real.

He’s 6-foot-2 but seems taller because he’s so broad. His muscles stretch an ordinary camel-colored knit shirt into a bulky superhero outfit. “I’m amazed how many people recognize me with a mask on,” the actor says, and it’s unclear if he’s being modest or truly doesn’t know how cinematic he looks — even his wavy jet-black hair with its jagged widow’s peak would give him away (you may recognize this hairline from films such as Mission Impossible: Fallout).

Yet as we sit down for the first of our two interviews, Cavill’s brawn is quickly contrasted by his genteel demeanor that his colleagues say is typical of the 38-year-old Englishman. Take the way the Witcher actor typically starts his days on set: Cavill will select a crewmember, say hello, shake their hand and ask how their day is going. Then he’ll approach another crewmember and do the same — then another and another and …

“It’s to the point where sometimes our ADs are like, ‘OK, we have a huge crew, you can’t ask everyone,’ ” says The Witcher showrunner Lauren Schmidt Hissrich.

Explains Cavill: “A set is often rush-rush-rush, and we forget the basic human decencies. I want people to know I respect everything they do and they’re just doing a job like I am. To me, it’s just respect and good manners.”

It’s a characteristically nonchalant answer from somebody whose approach to his work is anything but casual. From Cavill’s recent selection of roles to his work ethic to his social media engagement, his strategic deliberation reflects the hard-core gamer that he is.

He’s played Superman in a trio of DC films (which have grossed more than $2 billion), launched The Witcher franchise (Netflix’s most watched original series until Bridgerton came along) and had a scene-stealing turn in 2018’s Mission Impossible: Fallout (which brought in $800 million worldwide as the highest-grossing film in the franchise). All of this has positioned Cavill as arguably the biggest action hero in the world who isn’t a household name — yet.

Zack Snyder calls Cavill “a warrior monk.” Fallout director Christopher McQuarrie sees Cavill a bit differently: In a town full of celebrities, “Henry is a classic movie star.”

“It’s not like there was something in the water in the 1930s and ’40s that there isn’t today,” McQuarrie says. “Movie stars are not as abundant now for two simple reasons: The industry wanted and cultivated stars, and there were people ready to do the work required to be stars. Henry is in the category of somebody hell-bent on doing the work, and that work is hard.”

Cavill is certainly working more than ever, set to star in John Wick director Chad Stahelski’s reboot of the action-fantasy Highlander, reprise his role as Sherlock Holmes in the Netflix sequel movie Enola Holmes 2, and head the all-star cast of Kingsman director Matthew Vaughn’s spy thriller Argylle. And Dec. 17, The Witcher returns for season two (with Cavill having just signed a new deal paying more than $1 million per episode, sources say). There’s also never-ending speculation that Cavill might be in line to play the most highly coveted character in action cinema — James Bond.

For his part, Cavill acts vaguely perplexed by all this. “Something has changed, something has shifted,” he says of his busy coming slate. “After 21 years of hard work, I have three jobs lined up. Maybe it’s me, maybe it’s my approach, maybe my value as a commodity increases being attached to things like The Witcher. Now I can really focus on the storytelling and grow from here.”

You can read the full interview at The Hollywood Reporter!

Henry Cavill for People Magazine

written by Jasper X.VIII

Henry spoke with People Magazine and shared his mental health philosophy, his diet, and more. Also featured are three outtakes from a shoot that he did for MuscleTech. Check them out in our gallery!

Henry Cavill has never been afraid of a challenge.

The British actor, known for his ripped physique in Man of Steel, spends hours training for his physically demanding roles. But the 38-year-old says he didn’t discover his love for the gym until later in life. “When I was in school I played sports,” he tells PEOPLE. “I wasn’t the most spectacular physical specimen back then, but I definitely had drive.”

That drive helped him land his first major physical role in Immortals. “I was doing a lot of martial arts and bodyweight exercises because it was apt for the character,” he says. “And the first time I really moved into lifting weights properly was for Man of Steel.

From there, says Cavill, his fitness journey took shape. “It’s evolved and developed in its own way depending on the characters that I’ve played or what I’ve had access to — the facilities, where I’ve wanted to go with my body and what I’ve wanted to do.”

These days, he says, he likes to maintain a baseline level of fitness that can be adjusted depending on his work. “I will do a lot of body building work for an aesthetic look for a project or a role,” he says, adding that he focuses on different body parts on different days.

Cavill’s fitness came to a halt in December after injuring his hamstring while working on The Witcher. While some people suffer a mental blow when injured, the Justice League star chose not to see it as a setback.

“When I look back, I realize, yes, it was a hard time,” he says. “I think one of the skills I’ve picked up over the years is just forging ahead regardless of difficulty or hard work or trials and tribulations. So when the hamstring injury came, I tried to look at the silver lining. It was like, ‘Ok. I was working insane hours and it was exhausting and I now physically can’t work because I’m on crutches.’ So I was focusing more on taking the time off and going, how can I best heal myself?”

He explains further. “When it comes to my mental health, [I] focus on what I can control and work on that. And that gives me something to work towards rather than something to deal with or work through or manage my life through.”

With the injury now behind him and no immediate roles coming up, Cavill is working on sprinting. “I want to build a better engine,” says Cavill, who has partnered with MuscleTech supplement company. “One of the things my physical therapy for my hamstring showed me was that I have a lot of capacity in my engine but I have not accessed it. And it’s something which I really want to build upon.” 

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Interview: Henry Cavill on His Intense Transformation in ‘The Witcher’

written by Jasper XI.VII

Henry spoke with Vanity Fair and discussed the eye damage, multiple wigs, and impromptu mud baths behind the hit series, The Witcher!

Vanity Fair: When you take on roles like Superman or Geralt, which have an existing fandom, is your approach different than it would be while playing a role that doesn’t come with that burden of expectation?

Henry Cavill: I suppose it is. I approach every role in the same way, with 100% effort and dedication. But with an IP attached, more often than not, I am already a fan of that IP if I’m playing the character. For me, there’s a heavy responsibility to do the character as much justice as possible from the source material.

When you approach a role from the perspective of both a performer and a fan, do you give more input? Do you feel more ownership over what a character like Geralt might or might not do?

I do think it carries more weight if an actor is well-versed in the lore. And it’s certainly beneficial to my performance if I know the world. There was collaboration in the process. I would make notes because the schedule was grueling, to say the least. I would often do my work in my two hours of hair and makeup every morning. When it came to getting to set, I’d have a few suggestions about dropping lines that felt they were too obvious. When it comes to book Geralt, it tended to be a bit more complex and nuanced than that.

Ultimately, [this was] Lauren’s vision and it was my place to represent Geralt, my character, as accurately to the books as I possibly could. I would email her every now and again, when a new script came through and she would always be receptive of the emails. [But] it was entirely up to her whether she chose to apply the thoughts in [them].

What were the challenges in translating a character like Geralt, who has a running inner monologue readers can follow along with, to the screen?

In the books, he has a very grim exterior and everything about him is potentially unlikable. When you couple that with the book’s inner monologue, you forgive him and you have an understanding for who this character is, because he has these long complex conversations with kings and queens. And he can have those same conversations with thieves and villains. And you really get an idea of the level of the philosophical nature of this character.

Lauren’s vision was more of an ensemble piece than the first Witcher books. It’s driven a lot more by the characters of Yennefer and Cirilla. So instead, I decided that less was more. I wanted to really show Geralt’s perceptiveness, his intelligence, his old age, his wisdom, because he’s an old man, essentially, as far as we’re concerned. That, for me, was hopefully going to give the audience—it’s almost like they’re trying to crack a cipher when it comes to Geralt. So when he does say something, it means something. He’s not shouting from the rooftops, and yet he is as large as a house of a character.

How much of that comes through in the actual voice that you developed for him, which is very different from your natural speaking voice?

The voice work really was very much in line with the idea of the character saying little. With Joey [Batey], who plays an amazing foil for Geralt in Jaskier, it’s nonstop jibber jabber. A lot of it’s very funny. I took rather obvious inspiration from Doug Cockle, who voices Geralt in the games. He has a slightly more whisper tone than mine. And it’s an American accent. But mine, I tried to make it as different as possible, so I’m not just copying him. A lot of my inspiration came from there, but I didn’t work with any voice coaches. I just found it as I went along.

With the look of Geralt, you could have gone a couple of ways. If you wanted to distinguish him entirely from the video game version, you might have chosen a different wig.

The wig was a long, long journey. Jacqui Rathore, who was in charge of the wig for me, she was having nightmares about that wig. She was taking it home every night—I think she had three of them—she was taking them home every night, working on them more and more and more. But by the end of the show, by episode one reshoots, fortunately, the wig was just on point. For me, for the character, it was important to have that white wig. It’s gray more than anything else now, because white on camera, in those lights, ends up shining like the moon and it looked, frankly, ridiculous.

Read the full interview at Vanity Fair!

Henry Cavill for Inquirer Entertainment

written by Jasper XX.XII

Last week, Henry flew to Manila, Philippines to promote The Witcher, and Inquirer Entertainment had a one-on-one chat with him. Check out an excerpt below and the full interview at their website. I have also added some outtakes into the gallery!

You’re a gamer. Does that inform your performance as monster slayer Geralt of Rivia, the Butcher of Blaviken, in “The Witcher”?
It would be impossible to say that it doesn’t inform my portrayal in the series. Because there’s a huge influence that that experience had on me. I mean, I played the game for hundreds of hours (laughs). And so, there will always be an influence in one way, shape or form.

It’s about me making sure my target is realized. And that is to make Geralt as accurate to the books as possible, and as enjoyable for people like myself and “The Witcher’s” fans, as well. That was always my goal. I wanted to make Geralt the character who I experienced and continue to experience [as an avid gaming enthusiast].

In what way do you channel Geralt’s brooding demeanor? Are you as dark in person, because we mostly associate you with Superman and the other larger-than-life characters you portray?
I think everyone has some darkness in them. As an actor, it’s about accessing those different parts of your personality that are required for the role. With Geralt, it’s not necessarily his darkness that’s interesting, it’s more his stone-cold exterior and indifference.

When you see him commit what some people would call atrocities, he’s actually not doing it out of darkness. That’s what is interesting about the character, his intentions always come from the light, not from his dark side—not like August Walker [in “Mission: Impossible”].

In fact, even August Walker’s intentions were [good], but he was just willing to do some terrible things to achieve them—which made them dark! Whereas Geralt, his actions are always intended to do something good. It’s just unfortunate that the path he takes tends to shine a dark light upon his actions.

There’s some fine singing in “The Witcher,” which helps leaven the doom and gloom of the material. It somehow brightens all that dark brooding. Didn’t you want to sing in it, too? We know that you played Sonny in “Grease” when you were in school.
Absolutely, the music here is fantastic. But that’s actually a wonderful reflection of “The Witcher’s” world. The bard Jaskier (Joey Batey) is such a fantastic character because he does seem to work as contrast to all of the show’s darkness, grim politics and harsh realities.

But as far as having Geralt do some singing, he really isn’t much of a performer. Would he ever sing? It would be difficult to sing in that gruff and brooding voice, I think. No, he hasn’t got much of a singing voice (laughs).

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