Henry Cavill for People Magazine

written by Jasper X.VIII

Henry spoke with People Magazine and shared his mental health philosophy, his diet, and more. Also featured are three outtakes from a shoot that he did for MuscleTech. Check them out in our gallery!

Henry Cavill has never been afraid of a challenge.

The British actor, known for his ripped physique in Man of Steel, spends hours training for his physically demanding roles. But the 38-year-old says he didn’t discover his love for the gym until later in life. “When I was in school I played sports,” he tells PEOPLE. “I wasn’t the most spectacular physical specimen back then, but I definitely had drive.”

That drive helped him land his first major physical role in Immortals. “I was doing a lot of martial arts and bodyweight exercises because it was apt for the character,” he says. “And the first time I really moved into lifting weights properly was for Man of Steel.

From there, says Cavill, his fitness journey took shape. “It’s evolved and developed in its own way depending on the characters that I’ve played or what I’ve had access to — the facilities, where I’ve wanted to go with my body and what I’ve wanted to do.”

These days, he says, he likes to maintain a baseline level of fitness that can be adjusted depending on his work. “I will do a lot of body building work for an aesthetic look for a project or a role,” he says, adding that he focuses on different body parts on different days.

Cavill’s fitness came to a halt in December after injuring his hamstring while working on The Witcher. While some people suffer a mental blow when injured, the Justice League star chose not to see it as a setback.

“When I look back, I realize, yes, it was a hard time,” he says. “I think one of the skills I’ve picked up over the years is just forging ahead regardless of difficulty or hard work or trials and tribulations. So when the hamstring injury came, I tried to look at the silver lining. It was like, ‘Ok. I was working insane hours and it was exhausting and I now physically can’t work because I’m on crutches.’ So I was focusing more on taking the time off and going, how can I best heal myself?”

He explains further. “When it comes to my mental health, [I] focus on what I can control and work on that. And that gives me something to work towards rather than something to deal with or work through or manage my life through.”

With the injury now behind him and no immediate roles coming up, Cavill is working on sprinting. “I want to build a better engine,” says Cavill, who has partnered with MuscleTech supplement company. “One of the things my physical therapy for my hamstring showed me was that I have a lot of capacity in my engine but I have not accessed it. And it’s something which I really want to build upon.” 

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Henry Cavill for Inquirer Entertainment

written by Jasper XX.XII

Last week, Henry flew to Manila, Philippines to promote The Witcher, and Inquirer Entertainment had a one-on-one chat with him. Check out an excerpt below and the full interview at their website. I have also added some outtakes into the gallery!

You’re a gamer. Does that inform your performance as monster slayer Geralt of Rivia, the Butcher of Blaviken, in “The Witcher”?
It would be impossible to say that it doesn’t inform my portrayal in the series. Because there’s a huge influence that that experience had on me. I mean, I played the game for hundreds of hours (laughs). And so, there will always be an influence in one way, shape or form.

It’s about me making sure my target is realized. And that is to make Geralt as accurate to the books as possible, and as enjoyable for people like myself and “The Witcher’s” fans, as well. That was always my goal. I wanted to make Geralt the character who I experienced and continue to experience [as an avid gaming enthusiast].

In what way do you channel Geralt’s brooding demeanor? Are you as dark in person, because we mostly associate you with Superman and the other larger-than-life characters you portray?
I think everyone has some darkness in them. As an actor, it’s about accessing those different parts of your personality that are required for the role. With Geralt, it’s not necessarily his darkness that’s interesting, it’s more his stone-cold exterior and indifference.

When you see him commit what some people would call atrocities, he’s actually not doing it out of darkness. That’s what is interesting about the character, his intentions always come from the light, not from his dark side—not like August Walker [in “Mission: Impossible”].

In fact, even August Walker’s intentions were [good], but he was just willing to do some terrible things to achieve them—which made them dark! Whereas Geralt, his actions are always intended to do something good. It’s just unfortunate that the path he takes tends to shine a dark light upon his actions.

There’s some fine singing in “The Witcher,” which helps leaven the doom and gloom of the material. It somehow brightens all that dark brooding. Didn’t you want to sing in it, too? We know that you played Sonny in “Grease” when you were in school.
Absolutely, the music here is fantastic. But that’s actually a wonderful reflection of “The Witcher’s” world. The bard Jaskier (Joey Batey) is such a fantastic character because he does seem to work as contrast to all of the show’s darkness, grim politics and harsh realities.

But as far as having Geralt do some singing, he really isn’t much of a performer. Would he ever sing? It would be difficult to sing in that gruff and brooding voice, I think. No, he hasn’t got much of a singing voice (laughs).

Henry Cavill for Men’s Health

written by Jasper XIX.XI

Henry has graced the cover of next month’s Men’s Health magazine! In the interview, he talked about his movie projects, The Witcher, and whether he’ll play Superman again. You can read the full feature at Men’s Health website, but here’s an excerpt:

The Witcher combines the sneaky charisma Cavill displayed in U.N.C.L.E. and Fallout with the sinew and strength he built up for his superhero roles. After working on Fallout, Cavill was keen to do his own stunts on The Witcher, including rigorously choreographed sword fights. But he was most excited, he says, about the chance to understand Geralt’s place in the world. “It’s funny how much he’s actually like us,” he says. “Geralt has that thing of trying so damn hard and being misconstrued or not appreciated—of people having a negative opinion of you, despite you actually trying to do the right thing.”

Which brings to mind Cavill’s lengthy stretch as Superman—the three movies that made him an international star while also leaving a large segment of fans unsatisfied. He’s cautious when discussing the films themselves, so consider these assessments the height of his candor: Man of Steel? “A great starting point. If I were to go back, I don’t think I’d change anything.” Batman v Superman? “Very much a Batman movie. And I think that realm of darkness is great for a Batman movie.” Justice League? “It didn’t work.”

Cavill almost reprised his Superman role for a blip-sized cameo in this year’s Shazam! but says he couldn’t do it because of his Fallout schedule. That absence—coupled with the fact that The Witcher could wind up as a Game of Thrones–like epic that eats up a huge chunk of his calendar—furthered the speculation that his time in the cape was finished. “I’m not just going to sit quietly in the dark as all this stuff is going on,” Cavill says of the rumors. “I’ve not given up the role. There’s a lot I have to give for Superman yet. A lot of storytelling to do. A lot of real, true depths to the honesty of the character I want to get into. I want to reflect the comic books. That’s important to me. There’s a lot of justice to be done for Superman. The status is: You’ll see.”

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