The Bailiwick of Jersey (pronounced /ˈdʒɜrzi/; Jèrriais: Jèrri) is a British Crown Dependency off the coast of Normandy, France. As well as the island of Jersey itself, the bailiwick includes two groups of small islands which are no longer permanently inhabited, the Minquiers and the Écréhous, and the Pierres de Lecq and other rocks and reefs. Together with the bailiwick of Guernsey it forms the grouping known as the Channel Islands. Like the Isle of Man, Jersey is a separate possession of the Crown and it is not a part of the United Kingdom. Jersey has an international identity which is different from that of the UK, although it belongs to the Common Travel Area and the definition of “United Kingdom” in the British Nationality Act 1981 is interpreted as including the UK and the Islands together. The United Kingdom is constitutionally responsible for the defence of Jersey. Jersey is not a full member state of the European Union although it is included in the customs territory of the European Community.
Jersey is an island measuring 118.2 square kilometres[6] (65,569 vergée / 46 sq mi), including reclaimed land and intertidal zone. It lies in the English Channel, approximately 12 nautical miles (22 km; 14 mi) from the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy, France, and approximately 87 nautical miles (161 km; 100 mi) south of Great Britain. It is the largest and southernmost of the Channel Islands.
The climate is temperate with mild winters and cool summers. The average annual temperature, 11.6 °C (52.9 °F) is similar to the South Coast of England and the mean annual total sunshine is 1912 hours. The terrain consists of a plateau sloping from long sandy bays in the south to rugged cliffs in the north. The plateau is cut by valleys running generally north-south.

Source: Wikipedia.com