Henry Cavill for Square Mile

written by Jasper X.VII

Henry has blessed us with another gorgeous photo shoot as he graces the cover of this month’s issue of Square Mile magazine! He discussed a lot in this interview, including the much-awaited Mission: Impossible – Fallout, being Superman, some of his earlier projects, and much more. Check out the two covers and some outtakes in our gallery.

Cavill is bigger: north of 6ft, and with a build to make a wardrobe search for the nearest brick shithouse to cower behind. Your grandmother would describe him as a “strapping young fellow”, while your wife quietly slips her wedding ring into the nearest drawer. Never has a man looked quite so obviously Leading.

A cinematic star needs a cinematic setting – so we recruited the Shangri La penthouse at the Shard, and thus half of London sprawled out beyond gigantic panes of glass. We have gathered on the X floor of Europe’s tallest building to discuss Cavill’s role in Mission: Impossible – Fallout; or rather the little that Cavill can discuss about his role in Mission: Impossible – Fallout.

Refreshingly for a modern blockbuster – where spoilers are tossed into the first trailer, and the plot can be deciphered a month before general release – very little is known about the sixth installment of the M:I franchise. Naturally, it stars Tom Cruise as daredevil superspy Ethan Hunt, naturally there is a countdown to an imminent global catastrophe, and naturally a lot of vehicles will blow up.

Cavill is the headline addition to an ensemble cast that includes returning M:I alumni Simon Pegg, Rebecca Ferguson, Michelle Monaghan, and Ving Rhames – a veteran of the very first installment way back in 1996. (Cavill was 13.) Our man plays “primary antagonist” August Walker – a thrusting CIA agent whose methods clash with Hunt’s inexhaustible heroism. (Hunt can’t be much chill, although neither is Walker by the sound of things.)

“I’m forced upon Ethan’s team by the director of the CIA. August Walker is a sledgehammer to Ethan’s scalpel. He will get the job done no matter what. His MO is so different to Ethan’s that naturally they don’t get along at all. Walker has no problem with collateral damage,” notes Cavill with a certain fondness. “He’s fine with it.”

Which is fortunate, as the trailer promises plenty of collateral will be duly damaged. Including the leading man: Tom Cruise broke his ankle chasing Cavill across the rooftops of London. (Fortunately for on-set harmony, the men were filming at the time.) Cruise, the utter pro, finished the take, but production was halted for several weeks.

Cavill spent the hiatus developing the character of Walker – and enjoying a little downtime. Every cloud… “I didn’t break my ankle, so I got a holiday and my character got better!” he says cheerily. “Wasn’t even a cloud: just silver lining!”

After such a mishap, it might seem prudent to tackle the dialogue scenes and retire to the trailer for the heavy stuff. Cavill is made of sterner stuff, and insisted on performing the vast majority of his own stunts. (He can’t share much details about the lone outlier, except to warn: “If you have two actors involved in that stunt, it increases the risk tenfold. And when we’re talking about that kind of stunt, if the risk goes up just a little bit, people die.”)

Read the full interview over at Square Mile.

Henry Cavill for Hugo Boss

written by Jasper XXVIII.V

Henry Cavill is the new face and ambassador of Hugo Boss’ BOSS Eyewear. Their latest summer collection is launched as the #SharpenYourFocus campaign, and Henry is the perfect embodiment of this campaign. Check out some outtakes in our gallery! Also, check out a short interview below wherein Henry discusses how he approaches obstacles, and some behind-the-scenes clips from the photo session under the cut!

Henry Cavill for ‘How to Spend It’

written by Jasper XVII.V

Henry shows off this summer’s coolest casual looks in a new photo session, photographed by Damian Foxe, for HowtoSpendIt.com. How the fashion style makes Henry’s chiseled good looks stand out even more is out of this world. The website also offers details on the outfits and where you can find/purchase them.


May 17 Photoshoots

GQ Italia (April 2018) Scans

written by Jasper XVII.IV

As recently posted, Henry is featured in the April 2018 issue of GQ Italia. I have updated the gallery with scans and some outtakes from the gorgeous shoot. I will update them if I get them in better or higher quality. Henry also posted in his Instagram account a short behind-the-scenes footage from the shoot.


In a translated quote, Cavill shares, “When I was twelve, I was ready to go to England to boarding school: I did not know what was waiting for me. I was overweight, and kids can be mean. Or rather, it’s not fair to say mean guys: they are testing themselves and others, their limits, their place in the world.”

Cavill continues, “Removing the parents from the equation, a kid can remain a small hero or a little monster. It was not a good time. My superhero, in that situation, was my mother, who was able to give me the most challenging love, that of detachment.”

The 34-year-old actor recalls his mother saying, “If you keep calling three or four times a day, you will never get out.” He adds, “I can imagine how much it cost her to say, ‘You have to make yourself strong, and face this thing alone.’ And then there have been so many minor heroes, classmates, or older ones, who smile at you when they have no duty to do so, who ask you if everything is ok. It looks like nothing, but at that moment it is so much.”

Henry Cavill for Los Angeles Times: Superman’s Return in ‘Justice League’

written by Jasper XXI.XI

Henry spoke with Los Angeles Times during the Justice League press junket in London early this month. He discussed Superman’s return in the film, and confirms he’s still contracted for at least one more film to appear as the Man of Steel.

By now it’s likely not a spoiler to reveal that “Justice League” includes the return of Superman, who sacrificed himself to save humanity at the end of 2016’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.” That film, which was generally regarded as overly dark and somewhat unwieldy, gave audiences a version of Superman (Henry Cavill) that felt morose and off-base from the comic books. Here, filmmaker Zack Snyder — as well as Joss Whedon, who stepped in to direct the re-shoots — uses “Justice League” as a chance to reestablish the character.

“He’s definitely different from previous incarnations,” Cavill says, speaking a few weeks ago during the “Justice League” press junket here. “I feel like this is the natural progression from the end of ‘Man of Steel’ into what he is now. This is a rebirth of the character, to coin the D.C. comics franchise right now: It’s a refresh.” He adds, “This movie highlights the qualities of Superman that exist in the comic books. That’s something I’ve always been very keen to highlight in the character. This rebirth provided the opportunity for me to play those characteristics.”

Superman was largely left out of the marketing campaign for “Justice League,” and most of the cast and the filmmakers did their best to keep the revival a secret for as long as possible. But fans, especially those familiar with the comic books, had been speculating for months, asking: “How can you have ‘Justice League’ without Superman?” One of the only clues for his return? Reports that Cavill’s mustache for the upcoming “Mission Impossible” sequel had to be digitally removed during the re-shoots, meaning that Superman would be somewhere in “Justice League” (“That damn mustache,” Cavill jokes). As it turned out, the studio always intended to include Superman but did its best to keep the rollout spoiler free.

“I think die-hard fans will know you can’t have the Justice League without Superman,” says producer Deborah Snyder. “Without Superman, there was this loss of hope. At the end of [‘Batman v Superman’], there was this impending doom. This danger that was coming. That was the impetus of Bruce [Wayne] recruiting the Justice League. That was the why. But the threat is so big and large that they still needed Superman. They needed to be a team.”

“His self-sacrifice causes such a huge ripple,” adds producer Charles Roven. “It’s so inspiring that his presence is really all over this movie before you know whether or not he’s going to come back. The world is not the same without him, because he was representative of hope. Here’s the thing: We wanted to make a movie that was about hope and the positive force hope is. And it meant that you had to bring him back.”

The process by which Batman (Ben Affleck) and the other members of the Justice League bring Superman back to life is complicated, involving several scenes that would be impossible to fully explain here. Suffice to say that Superman’s lifeless corpse (which was not played by Cavill for these scenes) is not lifeless for long. And ultimately, it’s Superman’s reaction to being awoken from death that’s more interesting than how he’s actually brought back. His initial anger and confusion shift to an emotional confrontation with himself over what’s happened to Lois Lane (Amy Adams) and his mother, Martha (Diane Lane), since his death.

“I think it’s very confusing for him in that scenario, as it would be for any of us,” Cavill says. “He’s trying to work out what the hell happened. I’m sure there’s a sense of failure there, akin to that sense of ‘I wish I hadn’t died so I could still be here and the world wouldn’t be in the state it’s in now and I could have protected my mother and Lois from the pain they’ve been experiencing.’ There’s that sense of guilt, but it comes with unconditional love. It’s not rational. One of the great things about us is that we still care even though we may not have a reason to feel guilty.”

Read the full story.

Shopping with Superman: Henry Cavill for The New York Times

written by Jasper II.XI

Henry recently sat down with The New York Times for an interview, wherein he discussed the Superman legacy, his fashion style, taking the James Bond mantle, and many more, including his moustache!

LONDON — It’s not every day that you go shopping with Superman.

It was 10 a.m. on a sunny Friday last month, one of those rare autumn days when the English capital seems to have swapped weather with Santa Monica, Calif., when I first spotted Henry Cavill, the British actor who has put his stamp on the Man of Steel for a new generation of filmgoers.

Military erect, his arms folded purposefully, he was standing outside Gieves & Hawkes, the Savile Row clothier that has been outfitting the British gentry since King George III.

He was hard to miss. Regardless of one’s age, gender or sexual orientation, it can be agreed that the man is a specimen, a 99.9999 percentile hunk, a super man. I pictured a hypothetical ad in Variety: “Wanted: Actor. Untitled Superman project. Must be as handsome as Ryan Gosling, as charming as Colin Firth and as ripped as any starting linebacker on the Dallas Cowboys.”

He had arrived on Savile Row from his home in London’s genteel Kensington district to browse for suits on the eve of the publicity blitz for “Justice League,” the superhero blockbuster-to-be featuring Mr. Cavill alongside Ben Affleck as Batman and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman.

Aside from a Superman-ish forelock that tumbled down his forehead, Mr. Cavill looked more like a romantic lead from an E. M. Forster period drama, wearing a royal blue Cifonelli blazer, a dandyish confection of curls and a distinctly retro, and distinctly absurd, handlebar mustache.

“It’s for a role, ‘Mission: Impossible 6,’” he said sheepishly, referring to his giant crumb catcher. “It makes me feel a little odd at times. People think I’m some crazy handlebar-mustache-growing person.”

“But,” he added gamely, “I’m also playing around with it now, growing it a bit longer. Why the hell not? When else am I going to grow a handlebar mustache?”

To the degree the mustache was intended as a disguise, it failed. In recent weeks, the whiskers had seemingly become more famous than he was, inspiring countless tabloid items after Mr. Affleck jokingly referred to it as a “full-on porn-star mustache” during a “Justice League” reshoot.

Then again, Mr. Cavill has an uneasy relationship to fame. For years, he was a Hollywood’s king of the near miss. He lost out to Daniel Craig to be the next James Bond, and also to Robert Pattinson on both “Twilight” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” Although he has been working steadily since he was a teenager, he always seemed to receive second billing to his biceps.

But he has been flirting with A-list stardom ever since he inherited the role of Superman in Zack Snyder’s 2013 franchise reboot, “Man of Steel,” followed by featured roles opposite Armie Hammer in “Man from U.N.C.L.E.” in 2015 and now Tom Cruise in his latest “Mission Impossible” installment.

In person, though, Mr. Cavill comes across less like a Hollywood action hero than an English gentleman in the prewar sense, a vestige of an era when leading men were described as “dashing” or “debonair,” and civility meant something.

In a less august setting than one of London’s oldest bespoke tailors, he might be fair game for the “paps” (paparazzi), as they say in England, as well as for any hormonal young woman with a smartphone and an Instagram handle.

Read the full story.

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